Crazy Crystal Creations: How to Grow the Best and the Largest Crystals

To grow a single large crystal, set a bit of solution on a shallow saucer and let it evaporate to form seed crystals. Select one or a few to place into your main solution to act as nucleation sites for crystal growth.

From this I assume that the optimum syrup temperature for growing small fast sugar crystals is between and degrees. I tried it and while it works the quality of the crystals is so poor I can't recommend it. The risk is that before it dries the paint may dissolve part of the crystal or worse, the chemicals in the paint may react with the chemicals in the crystal. While it is still warm, pour a small quantity in the bottom of a warm metal pan. It can easily splash onto your hands and arms, causing burns.

If you're hoping to incorporate crystals into your next science fair project think about building a few different types of crystals and comparing their rate of growth, size, color, taste (when.
Crystals come in all different shapes and sizes. The purest and cleanest crystals, however, are usually also the ones that grow to be the largest in size. In this activity you'll compare the size and shape of crystals grown in different temperatures.
Mar 03,  · There a currently multiple way you can use in order to grow a nice big crystal, but don't expect hand-size crystals. Also, growing a clear crystal means maintaining its structure while keeping it away from any other crystal.
“Growing” crystals with borax powder and pipe cleaners is a popular kid’s craft and fun science experiment, but Amanda Kingloff made it possible for adults to try growing borax crystals without feeling the least bit sheepish.
In this chemistry science project, you will discover the best temperature conditions for making the largest, purest crystals by growing your own crystals out of borax (a home cleaning product) in different temperature conditions.

In this chemistry science project, you will discover the best temperature conditions for making the largest, purest crystals by growing your own crystals out of borax (a home cleaning product) in different temperature conditions.

How does the saturated solution look? Each jar should be about three fourths full. Place the second jar in the bowl full of ice that you prepared.

If needed, adjust the water level in the bowl so that the water reaches at least three fourths the way up the jar, but is not so high that it goes into the jar.

Check the bowl of ice regularly and add ice if it has melted. It may be difficult to observe the jar in the bowl—try looking at the string through the plastic wrap cover. Do you see crystals forming on the side of one of the jars?

Do crystals form in one jar before the other? How do the size, shape and number of crystals on each string compare with one another? Why do you think this is? In this activity you examined Borax crystal formation at two different temperatures, but you could try other temperatures as well; one way is to put one of the jars in the refrigerator.

How does allowing the Borax mixture to cool at a different temperature affect crystal formation? Try making crystals out of other materials, such as sugar or salt. How well do crystals form using other mixtures with water? You did this activity for at least five hours.

How do your results change if you grow your crystals for a longer period of time? Make sure to keep adding ice cubes to the water bath to keep it cool throughout the activity. Observations and results Did smaller, more abundant crystals form in the jar and on the string in the bowl of ice water, whereas larger, fewer, better-shaped crystals formed in the jar at room temperature? As the hot, saturated mixture of Borax and water cooled, there was more borax than could be contained by the colder water, and so this borax fell out of the mixture and formed crystals.

A crystal is made of molecules of a product that have come together in a specific repeated pattern. When the molecules of the crystal come together, other products that are often considered impurities, or the unwanted products of the chemical reaction, do not fit well into the structure, much like the wrong piece of a puzzle does not fit. If the crystals form slowly enough, the impurities will be rejected because they do not fit correctly, and instead will remain in the water.

This is why the crystals in the room-temperature jar should have been larger and more cube-like. But if a solution is cooled too quickly, there isn't time to expel the impurities and instead they become trapped within the crystal structure and the pattern is disturbed. Consequently, the crystals in the bowl of ice water should have formed more quickly and in greater numbers, but were smaller and less cubelike in shape because they had more impurities.

Tips, Tricks and Techniques , from About. Sign up for our email newsletter. Then, turn off the stove, let the water sit until it stops boiling, and pour it into a glass jar with a wide mouth that you can balance a pencil on.

As the water cools, the borax will attach to any fibers in the water, like string or pipe cleaner, and other borax particles, which forms hard crystals. This means that there are more solid particles in the water than the water can dissolve. Add 3 tbsp When you add it to the jar, let the borax settle at the bottom. Then, use a spoon or a glass stirrer to combine the water and borax. You should still be able to see white powder floating in the water after stirring for seconds.

Be sure to purchase the powder borax from the laundry aisle of the supermarket. Stir in drops of liquid food coloring if you want colored crystals. Pick 1 color for each jar to avoid making muddy colors that can look brown when crystallized.

Remember to stir the solution for a few seconds to distribute the color evenly throughout the jar. However, if you add too much, your crystals may be smaller because the water becomes less saturated as you add the food coloring. Make a shape out of pipe cleaner and tie it to a pencil to make an ornament. Bend a pipe cleaner into a simple shape, like a star, heart, square, or circle. Attach a short piece of pipe cleaner to the top of your shape by wrapping it around the top point, and then wrap the other end of the pipe cleaner around a pencil.

Cut a piece of string to fit inside the jar for the borax to attach to. Then, tie one end around the center of a pencil so it can dangle in the water. Lower the pipe cleaner or string into the jar, resting the pencil on the rim. Hold the pencil horizontally, and carefully move the pipe cleaner or string through the mouth of the jar and into the water.

Let the crystals grow for days before removing them from the jar. Place the jar in a place that is out of the way so the crystals can grow undisturbed for at least 24 hours. After the first day, check on the crystals to see how large they are, and leave them in the solution for up to 2 days to grow larger crystals. Cut the piece of string or pipe cleaner to display your crystals.

The crystals have formed around the fibers of the pipe cleaner or string, so you can safely remove them from the pencil. Simply use a pair of scissors to cut through the top of the string or pipe cleaner, and place your crystals near a window to see its beautiful structure. Crack or cut 1 egg in half widthwise and carefully rinse out the shells. Over a sink, use a sharp knife to cut through the shell and empty the egg into the drain.

If you want a more asymmetrical look, simply crack the egg in half with your hands. Then, run the egg shell halves under warm water to remove any residue. Use a cotton swab to spread a layer of glue on the inside of the shell. Use a small drop of craft glue or school glue on a cotton swab. Make sure the layers are thin and cover the entire surface area where you want the crystals to grow. Sprinkle a pinch of alum inside of each shell and let the glue dry overnight. Make sure the glue is completely coated with alum, which you can find in the spice aisle of the supermarket.

Then, leave the shells undisturbed for at least 6 hours to dry the glue. You can check to see if the glue is dry by touching the inside of each egg with your fingertip to see if the alum feels moist. About 2 minutes after the water begins to boil, remove it from the heat. Let it cool for 2 minutes, then pour it into a plastic container. Make sure you use a disposable one, since the food coloring and alum can change the color of the container.

It can easily splash onto your hands and arms, causing burns. Use a spoon to stir the solution until all of the crystals are dissolved. Touch the sides of the container every few minutes to check that the water is getting cooler.

Add 40 drops of food coloring if you want colored crystals. Only add 1 color at a time to the crystals to prevent them from becoming a muddy brown color as they grow. Submerge an eggshell in the solution with the open side facing up. Put on a pair of latex or rubber gloves and carefully lower one of the shells into the water.

Adjust it with your hands so that the open part is facing the top of the water as much as possible. If you reach into the water without gloves on, you can stain your hands due to the alum and food coloring. Leave the shell in the container overnight to grow before removing it.

Try not to move the containers while the crystals grow, as this can cause the egg to shift.

Detailed instructions with pictures on how to grow dozens of different types of crystals Fast, simple crystal growing projects A salt garden (Good for classroom demonstrations.) The simplest, fastest crystals of all to grow (Good for classroom demonstrations.) Super-fast crystals (At last that's what one site claimed. To grow a single large crystal, set a bit of solution on a shallow saucer and let it evaporate to form seed crystals. Select one or a few to place into your main solution to act as nucleation sites for crystal growth. Crystals come in all different shapes and sizes. The purest and cleanest crystals, however, are usually also the ones that grow to be the largest in size. In this activity you'll compare the size and shape of crystals grown in different temperatures.